Saudi Arabia and an all women BPO

Here is how TCS bridged the Gulf with an all-women BPO (Business Process Outsourcing) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.  

The centre which was inaugurated as a joint venture between TCS and GE in 2014 - and with GE and Saudi Aramco as anchor clients - was probably among the first BPOs to set up shop in Saudi Arabia. It was the first BPO in the region to employ only women. What makes things even more interesting is that each one of the 1,000-odd employees at the centre are women — in a country where women aren't allowed to drive. 
Ensuring that an all-women workplace stayed that way was another matter.

"We had to think of the minutest of details like what happens if a faucet bursts or we need an electrician or for that matter a global executive of TCS visits the campus," says a TCS executive, who was involved in brainstorming the operational issues for the campus. Today, even the janitors and support staff at the campus are women. "In cases where services of a man are required, announcements are made, so that women employees can put on their abayas and niqabs - or leave the room," adds the executive.
 

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/51654418.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

Anjana Nagarajan

Here is how TCS bridged the Gulf with an all-women BPO (Business Process Outsourcing) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.  

The centre which was inaugurated as a joint venture between TCS and GE in 2014 - and with GE and Saudi Aramco as anchor clients - was probably among the first BPOs to set up shop in Saudi Arabia. It was the first BPO in the region to employ only women. What makes things even more interesting is that each one of the 1,000-odd employees at the centre are women — in a country where women aren't allowed to drive. 
Ensuring that an all-women workplace stayed that way was another matter.

"We had to think of the minutest of details like what happens if a faucet bursts or we need an electrician or for that matter a global executive of TCS visits the campus," says a TCS executive, who was involved in brainstorming the operational issues for the campus. Today, even the janitors and support staff at the campus are women. "In cases where services of a man are required, announcements are made, so that women employees can put on their abayas and niqabs - or leave the room," adds the executive.
 

Read more at:
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/51654418.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

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