Mummy I Want to Be A You Tuber!

Today career paths look very different from those of our parents. While many of us begin careers in a particular field, it is quite likely that some may switch gears mid-career to move into other roles and follow trajectories that we could not have anticipated when we first got started.  

Why? Well, industries, organizations, technologies and roles are evolving at a faster pace than ever before and they demand a workforce with an agile, skilful mindset. Are you curious, willing to take risks, think out of the box, take on challenging tasks and interested in learning new things? Then you may be the kind of person who can nimbly tap opportunities to take organizations in daring and original directions and be successful in doing so.

Are you ready to try something different? You know who does? Our children. With few preconceived notions about how things ought to be they view new opportunities with wonder and excitement, something perhaps we have forgotton to do. And maybe, in learning different tools to re-equip ourselves to navigate our evolving, fluid workplaces, we may find common bonds with our children as they take on the opportunties the world throws at them.

Bangalore-based marketing expert Jessie Paul shares her story:

"As a child I wanted to be an air hostess. Or if I didn’t end up tall enough for that, a diplomat.  The aim was to see the world.  I joined the IT industry and achieved my dream, but that is not the point of today’s story.  My parents were very supportive of these “When I grow up…” statements, and nodded cheerfully.  But today’s generation doesn’t have to wait till they are grown up to try out some of their ideas.  A six year old made $11 million reviewing toys on YouTube, with the support of his family.  Erik Finman, invested a $1000 gift from grandma in Bitcoin at the age of 12 and is a millionaire now at 18.  Though his family is well-populated with PhDs, he does not see the point of college.  India has YouTube millionaires too, though since the payout is less here there are fewer of them.  But there is potential and it is age agnostic.  So if a young person says “I want to be a YouTuber” or “(Bitcoin) Miner” you’re probably better off saying yes and gifting them the seed money!  These are careers that did not exist a decade ago and are still not mainstream.  But it is a sign of what kind of new jobs will be created - requiring creativity, risk-taking and perseverance.  And traditional schooling isn’t a must for these careers - as Erik Finman says YouTube and Wikipedia can teach you a lot of what is required.

What triggered this was helping my eight year old put together her first YouTube channel to promote DIY craft ideas this week.  Since I haven’t any bitcoin this will have to be my retirement plan - so please do visit and subscribe generously at Overcreative DIY. She (and I) are still figuring things out, in terms of storyboarding, lighting and editing - tool ideas welcome. One unintended and curious development of the YouTuber culture is that the DIYers all sound rather similar.  Whether they are in Norway, US or India they have the same sing-songy accent.   Hmm. So even as local languages proliferate, we’ll see universalization of “YouTube English” the pidgin of the new generation.   

It’s a bit late to jump on the Bitcoin bandwagon, but perhaps a YouTube channel would be a logical extension of this newsletter?  What do you think? Or is it just a sign of a mid-life crisis!  What are you doing to embrace all these new things in your lives?  Because the scary thought is that in a couple of years if you don’t ‘get’ AI, IOT, blockchain and whatever else is coming shortly, employment may be a challenge."  
 

Talking Cranes

Today career paths look very different from those of our parents. While many of us begin careers in a particular field, it is quite likely that some may switch gears mid-career to move into other roles and follow trajectories that we could not have anticipated when we first got started.  

Why? Well, industries, organizations, technologies and roles are evolving at a faster pace than ever before and they demand a workforce with an agile, skilful mindset. Are you curious, willing to take risks, think out of the box, take on challenging tasks and interested in learning new things? Then you may be the kind of person who can nimbly tap opportunities to take organizations in daring and original directions and be successful in doing so.

Are you ready to try something different? You know who does? Our children. With few preconceived notions about how things ought to be they view new opportunities with wonder and excitement, something perhaps we have forgotton to do. And maybe, in learning different tools to re-equip ourselves to navigate our evolving, fluid workplaces, we may find common bonds with our children as they take on the opportunties the world throws at them.

Bangalore-based marketing expert Jessie Paul shares her story:

"As a child I wanted to be an air hostess. Or if I didn’t end up tall enough for that, a diplomat.  The aim was to see the world.  I joined the IT industry and achieved my dream, but that is not the point of today’s story.  My parents were very supportive of these “When I grow up…” statements, and nodded cheerfully.  But today’s generation doesn’t have to wait till they are grown up to try out some of their ideas.  A six year old made $11 million reviewing toys on YouTube, with the support of his family.  Erik Finman, invested a $1000 gift from grandma in Bitcoin at the age of 12 and is a millionaire now at 18.  Though his family is well-populated with PhDs, he does not see the point of college.  India has YouTube millionaires too, though since the payout is less here there are fewer of them.  But there is potential and it is age agnostic.  So if a young person says “I want to be a YouTuber” or “(Bitcoin) Miner” you’re probably better off saying yes and gifting them the seed money!  These are careers that did not exist a decade ago and are still not mainstream.  But it is a sign of what kind of new jobs will be created - requiring creativity, risk-taking and perseverance.  And traditional schooling isn’t a must for these careers - as Erik Finman says YouTube and Wikipedia can teach you a lot of what is required.

What triggered this was helping my eight year old put together her first YouTube channel to promote DIY craft ideas this week.  Since I haven’t any bitcoin this will have to be my retirement plan - so please do visit and subscribe generously at Overcreative DIY. She (and I) are still figuring things out, in terms of storyboarding, lighting and editing - tool ideas welcome. One unintended and curious development of the YouTuber culture is that the DIYers all sound rather similar.  Whether they are in Norway, US or India they have the same sing-songy accent.   Hmm. So even as local languages proliferate, we’ll see universalization of “YouTube English” the pidgin of the new generation.   

It’s a bit late to jump on the Bitcoin bandwagon, but perhaps a YouTube channel would be a logical extension of this newsletter?  What do you think? Or is it just a sign of a mid-life crisis!  What are you doing to embrace all these new things in your lives?  Because the scary thought is that in a couple of years if you don’t ‘get’ AI, IOT, blockchain and whatever else is coming shortly, employment may be a challenge."  
 

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