"The Girls' Lounge" @ The World Economic Forum in Davos

On the eve of the World Economic Forum in Davos - a place where male attendees outnumber females five to one, the space is just being prepared.  
Shelley Zalis - who started The Girls' Lounge five years ago - is unapologetic:

"This is their boys' club - for women to get to know other women.

"There are masculine and feminine styles of leadership and we encourage women to find and lead with their strengths. We need both [styles] or we're all the same," she says.

Beyond Ms Zalis' deliberately provocative and attention-grabbing approach, her point is that women need to take on leadership in whichever way they choose, not emulating the male, institutional model.

"We have to stop fixing the women. We have to fix our mindset and recalibrate our mindset on equality and understand men and women are all equal. Until society and corporations value the individual strengths of each person we won't progress," she says.

And in The Girls' Lounge, underneath the seemingly fluffy interior, there's plenty of hard facts.

In it, for example, there are ten clocks from various countries. Based on a nine to five day, they point to the time a woman should leave work according to the wage gap in the country.

While Ms Zalis' initial aim was simply to provide a space for women to feel less isolated at male dominated business events, the Girls' Lounge now hosts serious talks on addressing inequality and has attracted some heavyweight commercial partners including Unilever and Google.

Read more: http://www.bbc.com/news/business-38638325

Talking Cranes

On the eve of the World Economic Forum in Davos - a place where male attendees outnumber females five to one, the space is just being prepared.  
Shelley Zalis - who started The Girls' Lounge five years ago - is unapologetic:

"This is their boys' club - for women to get to know other women.

"There are masculine and feminine styles of leadership and we encourage women to find and lead with their strengths. We need both [styles] or we're all the same," she says.

Beyond Ms Zalis' deliberately provocative and attention-grabbing approach, her point is that women need to take on leadership in whichever way they choose, not emulating the male, institutional model.

"We have to stop fixing the women. We have to fix our mindset and recalibrate our mindset on equality and understand men and women are all equal. Until society and corporations value the individual strengths of each person we won't progress," she says.

And in The Girls' Lounge, underneath the seemingly fluffy interior, there's plenty of hard facts.

In it, for example, there are ten clocks from various countries. Based on a nine to five day, they point to the time a woman should leave work according to the wage gap in the country.

While Ms Zalis' initial aim was simply to provide a space for women to feel less isolated at male dominated business events, the Girls' Lounge now hosts serious talks on addressing inequality and has attracted some heavyweight commercial partners including Unilever and Google.

Read more: http://www.bbc.com/news/business-38638325

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