Mentor Details

Sangeeta Sundaram
Co-Founder & Prinicipal
Nucleus Insights

Sangeeta is the co-founder of Nucleus Insights, a consulting organisation focused on three areas- Transformation, Culture and Leadership - and works with Public and Private sector organisations. It brings together over 40 years of experience of working with communities and organisations across the globe.

Sangeeta has 15 years of experience in marketing and communications and all through her professional career, helped integrate it into overall organization strategy. 

She is passionate about leadership development and has delivered programs for leadership teams around communication, personal presence and leadership effectiveness. Her practical experience in using the tools and frameworks for building high performance teams and the discovery of profound power of the simple methodologies, led her to conceptualize a consulting company that would offer people these same methods. And Nucleus Insights is a reality of that idea. 
Sangeeta enjoys writing and is a key contributor to the blog on www.nucleusinsights.com/blog

She is recently certified as the first teacher in India on Gokhale Method which uses primal posture and movement to help re-establish the body's structural integrity and regain a pain-free life. 

Specialties: Core areas of expertise include Leadership Development, Facilitation, Change Management, Market Development, Corporate Communications, Strategic Brand management

Q&A

Do you think that starting the conversation is probably the most important thing that Sheryl Sandberg did by writing her book Lean In? I did not find her comments to be illuminating or even practical in many ways. I think the solution is more about equal opportunity and equality than leaning-in or working harder. When "working moms" mean the same as "working dads", that would be a wonderful state!
Sangeeta Sundaram : What I appreciated the most was Sheryl Sandberg’s attempt at starting a conversation on the issue of women having equal ambitions in the workforce. Her accepting that she was a feminist in not the bra-burning kind of way, but someone who deeply believes in the social, political and economic equality of the sexes, and for building a case that women leaders are in the best position to help other women. I truly believe that women leaders can create much larger ripples if they shared their stories and spoke to other women. I have experienced this personally. One of my ex-bosses was the first woman to lead a large technology services company in the country. As soon as she was named the CEO, there was a line up of prominent publications wanting to meet her and publish stories about her personal growth. But she refused; she believed that it would undermine her image as a professional woman executive. She didn’t want to be seen speaking only on women’s issues over business issues. My PR manager and I had a tough time convincing her to do some of these meetings. So I worked it out with her that for every 3 business related interviews/conferences she had, she should do one on women’s related interviews/conferences. And it was fascinating to learn her perspectives during some of these meetings. She was a perfect example of a person who had “Leaned-In”, she truly believed that there was no glass ceiling and in fact it was a great advantage being the only woman on a high-powered board as she got heard more! She used her strong business acumen with her feminine qualities to an advantage. Her outlook on life was so radically different from other women, be it in terms of managing her schedule or raising her child, that it was refreshing to hear them. In conferences, young women always walked up to her and said how she had inspired them to aim higher. After seeing the impact she was having, she became amenable to do a few more of such meetings both internally in the organisation and outside as well.